Distance Learning: How Is This Going To Work?

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Hi, guys.

You know by now that the Cobb County School District has decided to close all campuses and move to distance learning as of Monday, March 16th.  At this point, we don’t know how long the campus closures will last.  What we DO know is this: school isn’t canceled.  It’s just moved online.

For every day that we do not meet on campus, you will have a lesson for AP Comparative Government and Politics posted to this blog.  Each lesson is meant to last about 45 minutes. Often, there will be an assignment that you will complete to show me that you have worked through the lesson– this might require filling out a form, or submitting a FlipGrid recording, or taking a quiz through CTLS.  Whatever technology I choose to use, I will provide written instructions for, and– if necessary– a video on how to use it.  I suggest that all lesson be turned in by 11:59 PM on the date of the lesson.  This is to make sure that you aren’t procrastinating– and if I see that you aren’t completing your work, I do plan on reaching out to parents to inquire as to what’s going on.

I will also be following county guidelines and having set Office Hours during which I will be online and available to answer any questions you might have.  My office hours will be from 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM, Monday through Friday. I will handle these office hours by using YouTube livestreaming: at the bottom of every blog post with lessons there will be an embedded YouTube video and associated link.  I will be live to discuss any questions you have about the lesson or technology, and you can communicate with me either directly through the YouTube chat, or through a Remind text message, and I’ll answer via video.  These videos will archive and will stay on the lesson page, so if you need to go back and rewatch them later, you can.  If you need to contact me outside of office hours, please do so by Remind or by email, and I will try to get back to you as quickly as possible.

Suggestions for Working at Home

First off, please remember that this is NOT a vacation: I absolutely expect you to complete your assigned work.  It is not optional.  This means that you need to treat Monday through Friday as school days– which they are.  To best do this, I suggest:

  1. Create a schedule and stick to it.  Set your alarm and have a routine.  Set a specific block of time aside for your school work, and make sure everyone in your household knows that’s time during which you need to be left alone to work– it isn’t time to do chores, or play games, or whatnot.  It’s school.  Schedule time to do fun things, too– art projects, video games, workouts, or whatever.  Make sure that you go to bed at a reasonable hour.
  2. Come up with a dedicated place to work.  I would STRONGLY suggest that this not be your bed.  Find a desk or table, and declare that to be School for the next little while.  It helps to separate relaxation space from work space– makes it easier to focus.
  3. Try to eliminate distractions. TURN OFF THE TELEVISION. And while most of us like listening to music while we work, it’s often a distraction, so make sure you can think and focus with any background noise.  If you need some gentle background chatter that isn’t distracting, I totally recommend using Coffitivity (creates sounds like a coffeeshop– just background chatter and noise).  I personally like the “University Undertones” track.
  4. Make sure you give yourself space to connect with friends and family, even if you’ve got to do it through virtual means.  Isolation is going to be good to help prevent the spread of the virus, but it can be hard on mental health.  If you feel anxious or depressed, please email your counselor, reach out to your parent or guardian, talk to friend, and consider: what can you do that will give you an outlet?  Journaling can be a good way to work through anxiety, as can meditation.  (I like to use the app Headspace, but there are lots of good ones out there.)  Art or physical activity can help, too.  And so to help you focus on what’s good out there, I’m going to send out a Remind message every day with my One Good Thing: something good that I saw or read or did that day.  I’d like you to text me back with your One Good Thing, too.

I’d much prefer to be in the classroom with y’all.  But we’re going to work together and figure this out, even if it’s hard– because protecting the most vulnerable among us is important and worth doing.

See you online, Warriors.

Ms. Galloway

May 21st: OPTIONAL AP Exam Prep,

Remember, your AP exam for Comparative Government and Politics begins at noon on Friday, May 22nd.  You need to log on by 11:30 AM, and you should have received your exam ticket YESTERDAY in your email, or on your MyAP account.  Do not delete this email, do not forward it to anyone else– just make sure that it’s there.

We’re going to have one final, last-ditch study session this evening (Thursday, May 21st) at 7:00 PM.  We’ll try to do some general overview of the case study countries, and some sort of review game– I’ll try to be creative and see what sort of game structure I can come up with.  I’ll send out the Zoom meeting invite via Remind on Thursday around 5:00 PM.

If you would like to play the Quizizz review game that we played at the end of the study session over Units One and Two, click here and give it a shot!  If you would like to play the Kahoot we played yesterday over Unit Three, click here!

Have you practiced taking the demo AP exam up on College Board’s website You should, just so you can get a feel for the technology and the process.

Are all of your Internet browsers up-to-date on the device you intend to use for the exam?  MAKE SURE THEY ARE, RIGHT NOW.  And remember that the exam WILL NOT WORK on Internet Explorer, or with the Grammarly plug-in on Chrome.

General Plan for the Week

While you can’t submit any more work to be graded, please go here to see last week’s assignments.

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to work on organizing information regarding political ideologies and political participation in our six case study countries.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Analyze, compare, and evaluate how people participate politically in the United Kingdom, Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the Federal Republic of Nigeria, the United States of Mexico, and the Islamic Republic of Iran.
  • Examine how political ideology affects political behavior and policy making in the six case study countries

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • Your notes, for review purposes.
  • Your very excellent brain.
  • A device capable streaming a YouTube video
  • Either the .DOCX file version or the .PDF file version of today’s organizer

How Are We Doing This?

  • Today, you’ll be examining political ideology and political participation– think about what ideas motivate political decisions and policy making, and what political participation looks like in each of the countries we’ve discussed.
  • If you would like further material on political these topics, you can watch the College Board’s overviews here:

 

No office hours today, guys– I have to go and shut down the classroom for the summer. 😦

May 20th: OPTIONAL Exam Prep,Civil Society and Political Culture!

Remember, your AP exam for Comparative Government and Politics begins at noon on Friday, May 22nd.  You need to log on by 11:30 AM, and you should receive your exam ticket TODAY in your email, or on your MyAP account.  Do not delete this email, do not forward it to anyone else– just make sure that it’s there.

We’re going to have one final, last-ditch study session on Thursday evening (May 21st) at 7:00 PM.  We’ll try to do some general overview of the case study countries, and some sort of review game– I’ll try to be creative and see what sort of game structure I can come up with.  I’ll send out the Zoom meeting invite via Remind on Thursday around 5:00 PM.

If you would like to play the Quizizz review game that we played at the end of the study session over Units One and Two, click here and give it a shot!  If you would like to play the Kahoot we played yesterday over Unit Three, click here!

Have you practiced taking the demo AP exam up on College Board’s website You should, just so you can get a feel for the technology and the process.

Are all of your Internet browsers up-to-date on the device you intend to use for the exam?  MAKE SURE THEY ARE, RIGHT NOW.  And remember that the exam WILL NOT WORK on Internet Explorer, or with the Grammarly plug-in on Chrome.

General Plan for the Week

While you can’t submit any more work to be graded, please go here to see last week’s assignments.

  • Monday, May 18thExam Prep: Judiciaries and Political Stability
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Tuesday, May 19th: Exam Prep: Political Legitimacy
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Wednesday, May 20th: Exam Prep: Civil Society and Political Culture
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Thursday, May 21st: Exam Prep: Political Ideologies and Participation
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Friday, May 22nd: AP Exam at 12:00 PM (log on by 11:30 AM!)
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes. You got this.

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to work on organizing information regarding civil society and political culture in our six case study countries.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Analyze, compare, and evaluate how civil society functions in the United Kingdom, Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the Federal Republic of Nigeria, the United States of Mexico, and the Islamic Republic of Iran.
  • Examine how political culture affects political behavior and policy making in the six case study countries

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • Your notes, for review purposes.
  • Your very excellent brain.
  • A device capable streaming a YouTube video
  • Either the .PDF file version or the .DOCX file version of today’s organizer

How Are We Doing This?

  • Today, you’ll be examining civil society and political culture– think about how people organize themselves for political action, and why political behavior looks the way it does in each of the countries we’ve discussed.
  • If you would like further material on political these topics, you can watch the College Board’s overviews here:

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

May 19th: OPTIONAL Exam Prep, Political Legitimacy Edition!

First off, we’ll be having another online study session TODAY (May 19th) at 6:00 PM.  Check your Reminds around 5:00 PM for the link and password to the Zoom meeting.  This time, we’ll be talking about some updates to the AP exam process that College Board just made public, going over the key concepts for College Board’s Unit Three, answering any questions you might have, and playing a live review game.  I strongly recommend that you join us if you plan on taking the exam!

If you would like to play the Quizizz review game that we played at the end of last week’s study session, click here and give it a shot!

Have you practiced taking the demo AP exam up on College Board’s website You should, just so you can get a feel for the technology and the process.

Are all of your Internet browsers up-to-date on the device you intend to use for the exam?  MAKE SURE THEY ARE, RIGHT NOW.  And remember that the exam WILL NOT WORK on Internet Explorer, or with the Grammarly plug-in on Chrome.

General Plan for the Week

While you can’t submit any more work to be graded, please go here to see last week’s assignments.

  • Monday, May 18th: Exam Prep: Judiciaries and Political Stability
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Tuesday, May 19th: Exam Prep: Political Legitimacy
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Wednesday, May 20th: Exam Prep: Civil Society and Political Culture
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Thursday, May 21st: Exam Prep: Political Ideologies and Participation
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Friday, May 22nd: AP Exam at 12:00 PM (log on by 11:30 AM!)
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes. You got this.

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to work on organizing information regarding political legitimacy in our six case study countries.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Analyze, compare, and evaluate how political legitimacy is used and created in the United Kingdom, Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the Federal Republic of Nigeria, the United States of Mexico, and the Islamic Republic of Iran

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • Your notes, for review purposes.
  • Your very excellent brain.
  • A device capable streaming a YouTube video
  • Either the .DOCX file version or the .PDF file version of today’s organizer

How Are We Doing This?

  • Today, you’ll be examining how each case study country handles the question of political legitimacy: how they create and encourage political legitimacy, and what acts as threats to that political legitimacy.  (You may find that this dovetails into yesterday’s work on political stability!  That isn’t an accident.)
  • If you would like further material on political stability, you can watch the College Board’s overview on political legitimacy here:

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

May 18th: OPTIONAL AP Exam Prep, Judiciaries and Political Stability!

If you would like to play the Quizizz review game that we played at the end, click here and give it a shot!

Have you practiced taking the demo AP exam up on College Board’s website You should, just so you can get a feel for the technology and the process.

Are all of your Internet browsers up-to-date on the device you intend to use for the exam?  MAKE SURE THEY ARE, RIGHT NOW.  And remember that the exam WILL NOT WORK on Internet Explorer, or with the Grammarly plug-in on Chrome.

General Plan for the Week

While you can’t submit any more work to be graded, please go here to see last week’s assignments.

  • Monday, May 18th: Exam Prep: Judiciaries and Political Stability
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Tuesday, May 19th: Exam Prep: Political Legitimacy
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Wednesday, May 20th: Exam Prep: Civil Society and Political Culture
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Thursday, May 21st: Exam Prep: Political Ideologies and Participation
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Friday, May 22nd: AP Exam at 12:00 PM (log on by 11:30 AM!)
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes. You got this.

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to work on organizing information over the judiciaries and political stability in our six case study countries.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Analyze, compare, and evaluate the judicial branches associated with the United Kingdom, Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the Federal Republic of Nigeria, the United States of Mexico, and the Islamic Republic of Iran
  • Consider how judicial independence is used and limited
  • Examine the threats to political stability in the six case study countries

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • Your notes, for review purposes.
  • Your very excellent brain.
  • A device capable streaming a YouTube video

How Are We Doing This?

  • First, if you still need to review material over the judicial branches of our six case studies, you’ve got a couple options:
    • Go to MyAP and take the practice quiz I’ve created for you all (which no one has taken yet, so that seems like it was a good use of my time…), and then:
    • Download either the .DOCX file version or the .PDF file version of the One Page Judicial Summary, and complete it using your notes and reading packets.
  • Then, once you’ve completed your work on the judicial branches, examine how each case study country handles threats to its political stability.  Download either the .PDF file version or the .DOCX file version of the One Page Political Stability Summary.
  • If you would like further material on political stability, you can watch the College Board’s overview on political stability here:

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

May 15th: OPTIONAL AP Exam Prep, Judicial Branches!

If you would like to play the Quizizz review game that we played at the end, click here and give it a shot!

Have you practiced taking the demo AP exam up on College Board’s website You should, just so you can get a feel for the technology and the process.

Are all of your Internet browsers up-to-date on the device you intend to use for the exam?  MAKE SURE THEY ARE, RIGHT NOW.  And remember that the exam WILL NOT WORK on Internet Explorer, or with the Grammarly plug-in on Chrome.

General Plan for the Week

While you can’t submit any more work to be graded, please go here to see last week’s assignments.

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to watch the College Board’s AP Comparative Government and Politics review video over judiciaries and judicial independence, and then you’re going to take a practice quiz on the subject on MyAP!

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Analyze, compare, and evaluate the judicial branches associated with the United Kingdom, Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the Federal Republic of Nigeria, the United States of Mexico, and the Islamic Republic of Iran
  • Consider how judicial independence is used and limited

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • Your notes, for review purposes.
  • Your very excellent brain.
  • A device capable streaming a YouTube video

How Are We Doing This?

  • First, watch the following College Board review video on judicial systems and judicial independence.  Consider taking notes as you do so:

  • Once you’ve finished watching the above video, please log on to MyAP.  Take the shortpractice quiz I’ve created on the subject.  The name is Judiciaries, Rule of Law, and Judicial Independence.
  • Have a marvelous weekend!

May 14th: AP Exam Prep, Legislative Branches!

I’m trying to figure out if I can upload the video of our study session on Tuesday, but Zoom is doing some weird stuff with the file, so I’ll get back to you on that.  But if you would like to play the Quizizz review game that we played at the end, click here and give it a shot!

Have you practiced taking the demo AP exam up on College Board’s website You should, just so you can get a feel for the technology and the process.

Are all of your Internet browsers up-to-date on the device you intend to use for the exam?  MAKE SURE THEY ARE, RIGHT NOW.  And remember that the exam WILL NOT WORK on Internet Explorer, or with the Grammarly plug-in on Chrome.

General Plan for the Week

While you can’t submit any more work to be graded, please go here to see last week’s assignments.

  • Monday, May 11thUnit Seven Assessment
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Tuesday, May 12th: Exam Prep: Unit Two Progress Check
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Wednesday, May 13th: Exam Prep: Executive Branch Organizer
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Thursday, May 14th: Exam Prep: Legislative Branch Organizer
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Friday, April 24th: Catch up day!
    • Expected time required: None, or whatever time you need. 🙂

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to work on an organizer over the legislative branches of our six case study countries.  Additionally, I’m including the College Board’s video study session on this subject, so you can watch it if you like to shore up your understanding on this subject.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Analyze, compare, and evaluate the legislative branches associated with the United Kingdom, Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the Federal Republic of Nigeria, the United States of Mexico, and the Islamic Republic of Iran
  • Consider how legislative independence is used and limited

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • Your notes, for review purposes.
  • Your very excellent brain.
  • Either the .DOCX file version or the .PDF file version of the Legislative Branch One Page summary sheet.
  • A device capable streaming a YouTube video, if you like!

How Are We Doing This?

  • Download the file located above.  You can either type directly into the form, print it out, or copy it over into your notes.  Use your notes and reading packets to help you find the information necessary to help you complete the form.
  • If you would like, you can watch this College Board study session on the legislative branches of our case studies:

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

May 13th: Optional Exam Prep, Executive Branches!

Thanks for coming to the review session, guys!  I’ll be posting the video of yesterday’s session tomorrow– sorry, I’ve been slammed over the past twenty-four hours.

Have you practiced taking the demo AP exam up on College Board’s website?  You should, just so you can get a feel for the technology and the process.

General Plan for the Week

While you can’t submit any more work to be graded, please go here to see last week’s assignments.

  • Monday, May 11thUnit Seven Assessment
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Tuesday, May 12th: Exam Prep: Unit Two Progress Check
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Wednesday, May 13th: Exam Prep: Executive Branch Organizer
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Thursday, May 14th: Exam Prep: Legislative Branch Organizer
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Friday, April 24th: Catch up day!
    • Expected time required: None, or whatever time you need. 🙂

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to work on an organizer over the executive branches of our six case study countries.  Additionally, I’m including the College Board’s video study session on this subject, so you can watch it if you like to shore up your understanding on this subject.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Analyze, compare, and evaluate the executive branches associated with the United Kingdom, Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the Federal Republic of Nigeria, the United States of Mexico, and the Islamic Republic of Iran
  • Consider how power and authority is used and limited in the executive branches and associated institutions

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • Your notes, for review purposes.
  • Your very excellent brain.
  • Either the .DOCX file version or the .PDF file version of the Executive Branch One Page summary sheet.
  • A device capable streaming a YouTube video, if you like!

How Are We Doing This?

  • Download the file located above.  You can either type directly into the form, print it out, or copy it over into your notes.  Use your notes and reading packets to help you find the information necessary to help you complete the form.
  • If you would like, you can watch this College Board study session on the executive branches of our case studies:

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

May 12: Optional AP Exam Prep!

You did it, guys!  That’s a wrap on graded assignments.  For the rest of this week and next, we’re just going to be focusing on exam prep.  So do what you can, when you can, and let’s get you ready to beat this thing.

But before you do anything– have you practiced taking the demo AP exam up on College Board’s website?  You should, just so you can get a feel for the technology and the process.

General Plan for the Week

While you can’t submit any more work to be graded, please go here to see last week’s assignments.

  • Monday, May 11th: Unit Seven Assessment
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Tuesday, May 12th: Exam Prep: Unit Two Progress Check
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Wednesday, May 13th: Exam Prep: Power, Authority, and Legitimacy Organizer
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Thursday, May 14th: Exam Prep: Democratization and Authoritarianism Organizer
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Friday, April 24th: Catch up day!
    • Expected time required: None, or whatever time you need. 🙂

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to log in to MyAP and take the Unit Two Progress Checks I’ve assigned. (This is the College Board’s version of Unit Two, not Unit Two for our class.)

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Analyze, compare, and evaluate the political institutions associated with the United Kingdom, Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the Federal Republic of Nigeria, the United States of Mexico, and the Islamic Republic of Iran
  • Identify the similarities and differences in parliamentary, presidential, and semi-presidential systems

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • Your notes, for review purposes.
  • Your very excellent brain.
  • A device capable of accessing your MyAP platform– something you can easily type on is preferable.

How Are We Doing This?

  • Log on to MyAP, and select AT LEAST one of three Unit Two Progress Checks I’ve assigned.  There are three available, and I would advise doing all of them if possible.
    • The Unit Two Progress Check with multiple choice questions is obviously not the format that the exam will be in, but it is a good way to assess what you know and don’t know about different concepts and case studies.
    • The Unit Two Progress Check FRQs are going to focus on judiciaries and rule of law, subjects that we’ve talked about, but which you may have largely forgotten.  Writing these short FRQs will force you to go back and review your material on these matters.
  • When you’re finished, review your scores– the multiple choice, at least.  Write down what topics were challenging for you, and what you would like to ask questions about in our Zoom study session tonight.
  • Good luck!

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

Grade Finalization and AP Exam Prep Sessions

Hello, all!

I just want to reach out and say, one last time, how proud I am of all your hard work and perseverance during these last couple of months.  No other graduating class has every had to muddle through the situation you currently find yourself in, and I’m so proud of how you’ve handled yourself.  Good work.

Grade Finalization

You will note by the timestamp on this post that it is after 5:00 PM on Monday, May 11th.  That means that everything you intended to have me grade should be turned in at this point. This DOES NOT mean that the grade you seen in Synergy is the final version of your grade; I have until May 14th to finalize and submit grades, and I intend to use that time.  As finalizing your grades is a rather complicated process this year, I’m going to ask that you do me the favor of adhering to the following guidelines:

  1. Hold off on the emails and texts about assignments until the afternoon of May 13th. I am going to spend the next two days going through every distance learning assignment and all the many emails of missed work I’ve received in the last several days (and there are a lot), and I’m going to work to clean up any errors, insert any work you did late, et cetera.  So that means that you DO NOT need to email or text me right now that you did assignment X—I need to spend my time right now entering grades and working through everything, so I’m going to ask that you be patient.
  2. Please don’t email or text me to ask if the work you did is enough to earn a particular grade. I know that a lot is riding on grades for some of you; I promise I’m not out to get you, and that I am taking the difficulties of the current moment into consideration.  But y’all know that I’m not a math teacher—I am not good enough to just off-handedly say, “Yes, if you do this one piece of classwork, it’ll push you up to an A.”  And I never, ever promise any student a particular grade.  It’s bad policy, and worse ethics.  Remember that you’ve had a fair bit of time to recover your grade, although I know circumstances have been less than ideal.  Have faith in the work you did, consider the level of effort and consistency you put forth this year, and remember that I like and value you no matter what.  You know more now than you did at the start of the year, and I know each and every one of you has grown in ability, in knowledge, and in experience– and that matters to me.  I hope it matters to you as well.
  3. If I have a question about an assignment or the lack of one, I will email or text you before May 13th. If I see that you tried to upload an assignment, or that something seems to have gone wrong, I’ll let you know.
  4. When I have all the grades I’ve received entered and the gradebook cleaned up, I will send out a final email. I intend to have this done by the afternoon of May 13th, so keep an eye out.  At that point I will ask you to check and make sure that there is nothing else I’ve missing.  THIS would be the point at which you should email me to ask me about assignments that you don’t see entered.  Try to hold back on the “Is there any way I can get an A?” questions, though. Just as a favor to me, please.
  5. I will have all grades finalized and submitted by 2:00 PM on May 14th. At that point, the grade is final, and will be what appears on your transcript.  If you have further questions at that time, please feel free to ask, but know that grades are unlikely to change unless there’s significant cause.

I know a lot of you have worked very, very hard these past few weeks and months, trying to keep your grades and spirits up—and I recognize that it hasn’t been easy.  I’m so very proud and grateful for the work you’ve done.  You guys are the best part of my job, always.

AP Exam Prep

I will continue to post OPTIONAL AP exam prep assignments on the blog up to May 21st.  Some of them will be run through MyAP, some will be organizers to help you get your notes together and review for the exam, and some will be College Board study videos.  If you intend to take the AP Comparative Government and Politics exam, I very much suggest that you take some time to work through this material.

Additionally, we’re going to do (at least) two Zoom review sessions.  The first of these will be tomorrow evening (May 12th) at 6:00 PM, and the second will be on Tuesday, May 19th, also at 6:00 PM.

I will also send out a notification via Remind around 5:00 PM prior to our review sessions with the Zoom meeting link and password, and I hope to see you there!

Thank you,

Ms. Galloway

May 11th: Unit Seven Assessment and Last Day of Instruction!

Guys, today is the very last day of formal instruction for AP Comparative Government and Politics, and your very last day to submit work to me to be graded.  Remember, I need everything you’ve got by 5:00 PM today.  This means I’m probably going to be hit up with a ton of emails and Reminds today, so be patient if I don’t respond to you immediately.  I promise, I’ll respond.  I just may be overwhelmed at the moment.

Even though our formal instruction will be done and I will NOT be grading anything assigned after today, I will continue posting work to the blog in order to help you prepare for your exam on May 22nd.  Most of the assignments will be either practice through MyAP, or they’ll be organizers to help you go back through your notes and get them into some semblance of order before you sit down to take the exam.

Additionally, remember that we’re going to have an AP prep Zoom meeting tomorrow, May 12th, at 6:00 PM to work through some big concepts for the College Board exam, and to play a review game or two. I hope to see you all there!

I know this has been a weird last semester.  It’s been strange and alienating for me as well.  But I want you to know how very proud of you I am, especially those of you who have stuck with the digital learning, and really tried to engage.  It’s not easy, and I appreciate your work.

Are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from our last week of instruction, please go here and take care of that.

  • Monday, May 11th: Unit Seven Assessment
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Tuesday, May 12th: Exam Prep: Unit Two Progress Check
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Wednesday, May 13th: Exam Prep: Power, Authority, and Legitimacy Organizer
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Thursday, May 14th: Exam Prep: Democratization and Authoritarianism Organizer
    • Expected time required: 30-40 minutes
  • Friday, April 24th: Catch up day!
    • Expected time required: None, or whatever time you need. 🙂

What Are We Doing Today?

You’ll be writing two short FRQs for your Unit Seven Assessment today.  One is more of a conceptual analysis– not the sort you’ll see on the exam, but it’s good content assessment.  The second is a quantitative FRQ, like you’ll see for Question Two of the exam on May 22nd.  These FRQs are, by nature, open note, so feel free to have your reading packet and notes in front of you while you answer them.  Do your best to try to answer BOTH questions in 50 minutes, and remember to LABEL YOUR ANSWERS.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Analyze, compare, and evaluate the political and governmental systems of Iran, and other course case studies.

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • Your notes, for review purposes.
  • Your very excellent brain.
  • A device capable of accessing your MyAP platform– something you can easily type on is preferable.

How Are We Doing This?

  • First, don’t you dare take this if you’re not up-to-date on your work for this course.  Make sure you’ve completed ALL the lessons for Unit Seven before you attempt this, okay?  I want you to do well, and that means doing the necessary legwork first.
  • When you feel comfortable with the material, get your notes out and place them somewhere nearby, so you can refer to them easily if you need to.  These FRQs, like your AP exam, is open note.  You may also want to get a sheet of paper and a pen– you won’t be writing your essay by hand, but you might want to take a moment and plan your response on a sheet of paper before typing.  Don’t take too long, though– this is a TIMED FRQ, and you will only have 50 minutes.
  • Now that you’ve read all the instructions, please log onto your MyAP account.  You need to navigate to your work for AP Comparative Government and Politics, and click on the Unit Seven Assessment. There’s no lockdown browser required.  As soon as you click to begin the assessment, you will have 50 minutes to write your response.
  • Good luck!

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.