Distance Learning: How Is This Going To Work?

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Hi, guys.

You know by now that the Cobb County School District has decided to close all campuses and move to distance learning as of Monday, March 16th.  At this point, we don’t know how long the campus closures will last.  What we DO know is this: school isn’t canceled.  It’s just moved online.

For every day that we do not meet on campus, you will have a lesson for AP Comparative Government and Politics posted to this blog.  Each lesson is meant to last about 45 minutes. Often, there will be an assignment that you will complete to show me that you have worked through the lesson– this might require filling out a form, or submitting a FlipGrid recording, or taking a quiz through CTLS.  Whatever technology I choose to use, I will provide written instructions for, and– if necessary– a video on how to use it.  I suggest that all lesson be turned in by 11:59 PM on the date of the lesson.  This is to make sure that you aren’t procrastinating– and if I see that you aren’t completing your work, I do plan on reaching out to parents to inquire as to what’s going on.

I will also be following county guidelines and having set Office Hours during which I will be online and available to answer any questions you might have.  My office hours will be from 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM, Monday through Friday. I will handle these office hours by using YouTube livestreaming: at the bottom of every blog post with lessons there will be an embedded YouTube video and associated link.  I will be live to discuss any questions you have about the lesson or technology, and you can communicate with me either directly through the YouTube chat, or through a Remind text message, and I’ll answer via video.  These videos will archive and will stay on the lesson page, so if you need to go back and rewatch them later, you can.  If you need to contact me outside of office hours, please do so by Remind or by email, and I will try to get back to you as quickly as possible.

Suggestions for Working at Home

First off, please remember that this is NOT a vacation: I absolutely expect you to complete your assigned work.  It is not optional.  This means that you need to treat Monday through Friday as school days– which they are.  To best do this, I suggest:

  1. Create a schedule and stick to it.  Set your alarm and have a routine.  Set a specific block of time aside for your school work, and make sure everyone in your household knows that’s time during which you need to be left alone to work– it isn’t time to do chores, or play games, or whatnot.  It’s school.  Schedule time to do fun things, too– art projects, video games, workouts, or whatever.  Make sure that you go to bed at a reasonable hour.
  2. Come up with a dedicated place to work.  I would STRONGLY suggest that this not be your bed.  Find a desk or table, and declare that to be School for the next little while.  It helps to separate relaxation space from work space– makes it easier to focus.
  3. Try to eliminate distractions. TURN OFF THE TELEVISION. And while most of us like listening to music while we work, it’s often a distraction, so make sure you can think and focus with any background noise.  If you need some gentle background chatter that isn’t distracting, I totally recommend using Coffitivity (creates sounds like a coffeeshop– just background chatter and noise).  I personally like the “University Undertones” track.
  4. Make sure you give yourself space to connect with friends and family, even if you’ve got to do it through virtual means.  Isolation is going to be good to help prevent the spread of the virus, but it can be hard on mental health.  If you feel anxious or depressed, please email your counselor, reach out to your parent or guardian, talk to friend, and consider: what can you do that will give you an outlet?  Journaling can be a good way to work through anxiety, as can meditation.  (I like to use the app Headspace, but there are lots of good ones out there.)  Art or physical activity can help, too.  And so to help you focus on what’s good out there, I’m going to send out a Remind message every day with my One Good Thing: something good that I saw or read or did that day.  I’d like you to text me back with your One Good Thing, too.

I’d much prefer to be in the classroom with y’all.  But we’re going to work together and figure this out, even if it’s hard– because protecting the most vulnerable among us is important and worth doing.

See you online, Warriors.

Ms. Galloway

April 3rd: Later Mexican Political History

Oooof.  Gotta love the county dropping grading guidance on us at 5:00 PM, and leaving us all with a bunch of questions.  I promise: when I know stuff, you’ll know stuff.  Until then, just keep on keepin’ on.

Annnnnnnnd yet again: are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from last week, please go here and take care of that.

What Are We Doing Today?

IT IS TIME FOR REVOLUTIONS, Y’ALL.  Some of you might be fond of the Haitian Revolution, or the French Revolution– both excellent choices.  You might be super into the American Revolution, and also Lin-Manuel Miranda.  But I ask you: HAVE YOU EVER CONSIDERED HOW AWESOME THE MEXICAN REVOLUTION IS? No? Well.  I am here to fix that.

Sorry.  This is (one of) my favorite topics to teach ever.  I’m going to nerd out a little.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Understand the importance of the Porfiriato, Mexican Revolution, and Constitution of 1917

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

How Are We Doing This?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • Get some paper, and prepare to take notes over the three short video lectures below.  I apologize for the sound quality– I recorded two of these before I had a decent headset, so the sound is a little tinny.

  • Once you’ve watched all three videos, here’s what you need to do:
    • Take a deep breath.  Let me worry about how grades and everything will work.  Trust that I’ve got your back.
    • Go and do something that gives you joy.

I’ll be back with more lessons in a week, guys.  Until then, take care of each other, find purpose, and wash your hands.  You know I’m just a text away if you need me.

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

April 2nd: Early Mexican History!

I know a lot of you are worried and upset about the cancellation of school, and at the time of writing up this blog post, I am, too.  But we’re going to be okay, guys.  Find patience, trust that I’m going to help you as much as I possibly can, and that we’ll work through this together.  Deep breaths, okay?

But because I can’t fix that right now, I’m going to focus on what I can do.  And what I can do is share my excitement and love for this material, and hope that it helps distract you a little.  And hey– GUYS.  IT’S THE BEST THING EVER. TODAY I GET TO INTRODUCE YOU TO MEXICAN HISTORY TODAY AND I ALREADY HAD VIDEO LECTURES RECORDED FROM A FEW YEARS BACK.  Awwwwwww yeah.  Thank you, Past Ms. Galloway.  You made Present Ms. Galloway’s life so much easier.

Mr. Auld wanted me to make sure that you had read his letter to you, so if you haven’t, please click the link and do that.  Make sure you participate, guys!  I’ve already sent him a slightly tragic and cringe-worthy photo from my senior year, so: I expect you to appreciate it.

Annnnnnnnd yet again: are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from last week, please go here and take care of that.

What Are We Doing Today?

We are going to learn about early Mexican political history!  Which is a thing I know a fair bit about!  And I’m going to have to cut it down to just, like, the basics because this is not a full semester course on the Porfiriato or 1910 Revolution, and that makes me sad.  BUT WE WILL SOLDIER ON, and learn exciting things about our excellent neighbor to the south.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Understand the political structures which developed in Mexico prior to European colonialism
  • Explain how colonialism impacted the political development of Mexico after 1519 CE

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

How Are We Doing This?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • Get some paper, and prepare to take notes over the three short video lectures below.  I apologize for the sound quality– I recorded these before I had a decent headset, so the sound is a little tinny.

  • Once you’ve watched all three videos, do me a favor: take a deep breath.  Go sit outside for a moment.  Enjoy the sun.  Think about what you’ve learned these past dozen years.  And then I want you to text a friend, and tell them about the best part of this school year.
  • That’s all I want you to do today, guys.  Just: find something good, and share it with someone else.  Come and hang in our Office Hours today if you need to talk it through, okay?

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

April 1st: Distance Harkness Discussion!

Happy April, y’all!  I hope your power stayed on during the storm yesterday– I know I appreciated being able to step outside and breathe after the rain cleared the pollen briefly.

Mr. Auld wanted me to make sure that you had read his letter to you, so if you haven’t, please click the link and do that.  I agree with him: this isn’t the way any of us wanted your senior year to go, but there are things we can control, and things we can’t.  Let’s decide to focus on what we CAN control to make the rest of this year the very best we possibly can.

To that end: are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from last week, please go here and take care of that.

  • Monday, March 30thPolitical Violence, Part 2
  • Tuesday, March 31st: Terrorism and Political Violence
  • Wednesday, April 1st: Harkness Discussion: Why Violence?
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Thursday, April 2nd: Mexican Political History, Part 1
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Friday, April 3rd: Mexican Political History, Part 2
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes

What Are We Doing Today?

Man, you guys had some great questions yesterday– if you come to office hours, I’ll do my best to answer some of them.  But today, I want YOU to answer some questions, based on our lessons over the last several days, and the Zinn reading you did for me yesterday.  So get your phones and ceiling fans ready– we’re going to do another Flipgrid discussion.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Work through the discussions of political violence and terrorism we’ve had over the past several days
  • Develop analytical skills needed to read and comprehend a complex text

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • The reading packet for Unit Six. You should have read pages 43-49: Howard Zinn’s “Violence and Human Nature” from Declarations of Independence.
  • A device capable of recording three quick Flipgrid videos.
  • If you cannot record Flipgrid videos, you will need to type a response to each discussion prompt, and email it to me at my school address.

How Are We Doing This?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • First, make sure you’ve read the Harkness readings for the day, and that you’re fully up-to-date on the material for this week.  If you’re not, DO NOT CONTINUE.  Do not pass GO, do not collect $200.  Go and catch up on your reading and work first, please.
  • When you’re certain you’re read, please record a Flipgrid video for each of the following threads.  Each thread has a max recording time of two minutes.  Be sure to thoroughly answer the prompt, and refer to the text or course material to justify your response:
    • Violence and Human Nature (Code: 1397b49b)
      • Prompt: According to Zinn, many scholars wrongfully credit history for the reason of violence and war. Why does Zinn believe their assumptions are “dangerous” when discussing the actions of human nature?  Do you agree with Zinn’s argument?  Why or why not?
    • Violence and Idealism (Code: 03adb016 )
      • Prompt: Zinn writes, “the unique ability of humans to imagine gives enormous power to idealism, an imagining of a better state of things not yet in existence.”  Do you think that this ability to imagine helps to prevent political violence, or might it be one of the causes of violence?
  • Once you are done recording and uploading your responses, wait a moment or two, and then please return to the topic threads and respond to at least ONE of your colleague’s responses.  Keep it profession and appropriate, okay?  Don’t make me delete your work.
  • IF YOU CANNOT USE FLIPGRID, you will need to type out a thoughtful response to each prompt and provide AT LEAST two textual citations in each response.  Then email me your responses.  I know that’s not particularly elegant, but it’s the best solution I can come up with, considering some of the limitations I know folks have.

Office Hours

March 31st: Political Violence and Terror

Are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from last week, please go here and take care of that.

  • Monday, March 30th: Political Violence, Part 2
  • Tuesday, March 31st: Terrorism and Political Violence
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Wednesday, April 1st: Harkness Discussion: Why Violence?
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Thursday, April 2nd: Mexican Political History, Part 1
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Friday, April 3rd: Mexican Political History, Part 2
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes

What Are We Doing Today?

Well, guys– today we’re talking about terrorism: what it is, what it isn’t, and how it works.  Turns out it’s a somewhat relevant topic in today’s political landscape, so maybe we ought to try and wrap our heads around it.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Understand the difference between terrorism and other forms of political violence
  • Explain the changing nature of terrorist structures
  • Understand the importance of secondary audiences to limit violence

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

How Are We Doing This?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • First, watch these two video lectures over political violence.  Pause as you need to in order to take notes:

  • Next, please complete the learning check below.  I’m going to ask you to come up with at LEAST two questions you have about the material I just presented.  This isn’t a topic I take lightly, and I want to make sure that I know what I’ve explained well, and what I haven’t:

Click here to complete your Learning Check!

  •  Tomorrow, you’ll be doing a virtual Harkness discussion— and don’t worry about submitting questions for this one, I’ll handle it instead.  Your reading for this discussion will be an excerpt called “Violence and Human Nature” from Howard Zinn’s Declarations of Independence.  You can find this reading in your Unit Six reading packet, pages 43 to 49. Make sure you’ve got it done before you start tomorrow’s assignment!

Office Hours

March 30th: Political Violence (Part 2)

I hope your weekend was relaxing and as fun as it could be under the circumstances– and I hope that you sat outside in the sun, or made something, or called a friend, or watched something marvelous, or read something that made the world feel a little bigger and warmer for a moment.

And I hope that you’re ready to get back to work. 🙂

Today’s the beginning of our virtual spirit week at North Cobb, so I made y’all a little video about what I miss about not being at school with you all:

And hey– are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from last week, please go here and take care of that.

  • Monday, March 30th: Political Violence, Part 2
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Tuesday, March 31st: Terrorism and Political Violence
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Wednesday, April 1st: Harkness Discussion: Why Violence?
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Thursday, April 2nd: Mexican Political History, Part 1
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Friday, April 3rd: Mexican Political History, Part 2
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, we’re going to continue our discussion of political violence.  We’re going to talk about free will, determinism, and different forms of political violence– including revolutions.  Which are maybe my favorite things to talk about, ever.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Explain how individual explanations can help us analyze the reasons for political violence
  • Understand how lenses of analysis can be layered to gain a better picture
  • Discuss the purposes and forms of political violence

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

How Are We Doing This?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • First, watch these two video lectures over political violence.  Pause as you need to in order to take notes:

  • Today, I’m not going to ask you to take a learning check on the material we’ve discussed.  Instead, I’m going to STRONGLY suggest that you begin doing your reading for the Harkness discussion we will be having on Wednesday.  Your reading for this discussion will be an excerpt called “Violence and Human Nature” from Howard Zinn’s Declarations of Independence.  You can find this reading in your Unit Six reading packet, pages 43 to 49.  It’s pretty thought provoking, so I’d like you to have a few days to sit with it before you talk about it on Wednesday.

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

March 27th: Political Violence (Part 1)

Yeah, this topic is going to take a couple days.  We’ve got some big ideas to unpack, here, and it’s going to take some heavy lifting.  How’s your brain doing?  Is it ready for some gymnastics?  I hope so.

Mr. Auld would like me to encourage you all to please respond to this survey about your experience with Distance Learning— he’s sent it out via Remind, but we would really like to get feedback from every Magnet student if possible.  You only need to fill it out once, though– so if you’ve already completed the form, you don’t need to do it again.

And hey– are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from last week, please go here and take care of that.

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, we’re going to dive into the topic of violence in the context of politics.  We’re going to do some heavy theoretical lifted today, so get your thinking caps on and let’s get ready to philosophize.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Gain a basic understanding of the concepts of violence, force, and agency
  • Understand how political violence differs from war or crime
  • Explain how institutional or ideational explanations can help us analyze the reasons for political violence

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

How Are We Doing This?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • First, watch this introductory video and take notes on the central concepts discussed therein:

  • Next, watch this PBS Idea Channel video on the concept of violence.  You should know: (A) this is a HARD video, because the concepts are difficult. Take it slow.  (B) You only need to watch until the 10:10 mark, because then the host does listener feedback stuff and it’s boring.

  • Once you’ve watching the PBS video, please watch the following video lecture and take thorough notes on the concepts I discuss:

  • After watching all the videos and taking thorough notes, please respond to this prompt through a Flipgrid video: “Consider what you learned in today’s video lectures.  Do you think that describing violence as the limitation of choice or agency is a useful way to think about the concept?  If you DO agree, why?  If you DON’T agree, what about the description is troubling to you?  Do you have any questions about this concept that you would like to ask?”
    • The link to today’s Flipgrid is here, or you can open your Flipgrid app and enter code ee85b064.
    • Please make one post with your own response to the topic, and then respond to ONE of your classmates’ videos.
    • If you cannot record a Flipgrid, you must respond to the above prompt above and email it to me.  PLEASE only do this if you are technologically unable to do a Flipgrid; I do not want to have to hunt through my email to find a million responses.  If you just don’t want to appear on camera– don’t! Hold the phone so that we don’t see your face.  If you’re nervous about recording yourself, write down what you would like to say, and then just read it aloud.

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

March 26th: Introducing Unit Six!

WHOO HOO!  On to Unit Six.  I’m not going to lie, guys: this one is my favorite.  Our organizing principle for this unit is political violence, and our case study is Mexico, and those are BOTH topics that I really enjoy discussing.  I know we’re in a weird situation right now, but I’m ready to go on this one, and I hope you are, too!

If you would like a peak into the lives of your teachers struggling to adapt to Distance Learning right now, we made a video for you:

And hey– are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from last week, please go here and take care of that.

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, we’re going to talk a little bit about what this unit is going to look like, and MAYBE WATCH A DOCUMENTARY?!  Guys, you have no idea how excited I am that I managed to find the documentary in question.  Like, on a scale of 1 to 10, I’m probably at a 13 or so right now.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Understand the general shape of this unit and the content we’ll be addressing
  • Help you begin to work through the vocabulary you’ll use this unit
  • Give you a sense of the role violence plays in Latin American politics

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

How Are We Doing This?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • First, watch this short intro video about this upcoming unit!

  • Then, make sure you’ve downloaded the material listed above: your Unit Six Guide and Vocabulary and your Unit Six Reading Packet.  (The password is exactly what you think it is.)
  • Go ahead and start reading the first few pages on political violence, if you like.  We’ll jump into new content tomorrow.
  • OPTIONAL ASSIGNMENT: If you are comfortable watching it, watch the 2005 documentary Our Brand Is CrisisNote: this documentary is 90 minutes long and DOES have some violent imagery and language in it, as is consistent with a documentary dealing with political violence.  If you are uncomfortable with this, you are absolutely NOT required to watch this film.  Instead, I would recommend Disney’s Coco, which is most excellent. 🙂 
  • If you DO decide to watch Our Brand is Crisis, when you’re finished, please quickly answer a discussion question here:

Click Here to Answer a Discussion Question!

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

March 25th: Argument Essay!

Hey, are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!

If you had difficulty getting the MyAP assessment to work yesterday due to the LockDown browser that was required, please send me a message on Remind– I have a make-up assessment you’ll need to take instead.

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from last week, please go here and take care of that.

  • Monday, March 23rdNigerian Political Economy and Review
  • Tuesday, March 24th: Multiple Choice Assessment
  • Wednesday, March 25th: Unit Five Argument Essay
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Thursday, March 26th: Intro to Unit Six
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Friday, March 20th: Political Violence
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to take use the material you’ve worked on this unit to construct an argument essay– remember how we did a dehydrated version of this FRQ during SPEAR a while back?  Well, now it’s time to use those writing skills.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Review material from this and our other case study units for this course.
  • Develop your argumentative writing skills.

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

How Are We Doing This?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • First, take a moment and review the rubric for the argument essay linked above. Make sure you understand what is required of you in terms of thesis, evidence, explanation, and refutation.
  • Then, review your notes for this unit.  Take a good ten minutes and make sure you have a general understanding of what we have discussed in this unit.
  • Place your notes to the side.  I can’t prevent you from using them during your essay, but I would ask that you try your VERY BEST to limit your use of them while you write.  Get your phone out, and set a timer for 45 minutes.  Again, I can’t jump through your computer screen and make you stop writing after 45 minutes, but I would ask that you try your VERY BEST to stick to that time limit.
  • Open your word processor.  Once everything is ready, download this prompt, and begin writing: AP Comparative Government and Politics_Argument FRQ_Nigeria
  • When you have finished your essay, please DOWNLOAD IT AS A FILE.  You are then going to upload that file to the link below.  DO NOT SHARE YOUR GOOGLE DOC WITH ME.  I want all the files to go to one easily accessible folder for me, and that’s why you’re uploading them to the form.

Upload Your Argument Essay Here!

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

 

See you online tomorrow, Warriors!

March 24th: Practice Multiple Choice Assessment!

Hey, are you ready to put a pin in the map and show up where you’re going next year?  Click here and add a pin!  (I promise it’ll work now.  I just didn’t have it on edit privileges for you guys yesterday. 🙂 )

General Plan for the Week

If you missed an assignment from last week, please go here and take care of that.

  • Monday, March 23rd: Nigerian Political Economy and Review
  • Tuesday, March 24th: Multiple Choice Assessment
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Wednesday, March 25th: Unit Five Argument Essay
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Thursday, March 26th: Intro to Unit Six
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes
  • Friday, March 20th: Political Violence
    • Expected time required: 45 minutes

What Are We Doing Today?

Today, you’re going to take a practice multiple choice assessment– mainly focusing on Nigeria, but involving several comparative questions and general overview practice questions as well.  This assessment will be provided through MyAP, and once you begin it, you will have 45 minutes to complete it.

Why Are We Doing This?

This assignment is meant to help you do the following:

  • Review material from this and our other case study units for this course.

What Materials Do You Need?

Today you’ll need:

  • A stable Internet connection
  • Your MyAP log on
  • Your very excellent brain

How Are We Doing This?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • First, please log on to your MyAP account.
  • Under your upcoming assignments, you should see any assessments your AP teachers have assigned.
  • Click on the assessment labeled Multiple Choice Assessment: Nigeria.  Once you begin this assessment, you will have 45 minutes to complete it.  You will not be able to navigate away from the site while taking the assessment, as there are secure questions included in this assessment.
  • Once you’re finished with your assessment, go and enjoy your day!  Tomorrow, you’ll be writing me a timed argument essay, however, so it wouldn’t hurt for you to also review your notes for this unit. 🙂

Office Hours

If you have any questions or concerns about this assignment or any other, or just want to chat a bit, please join the chat on YouTube between 10:30 AM and 12:00 PM today, or send me a note on Remind.  I’ll begin each livestream with a quick overview of the day’s assignments for both Honors World History and AP Comparative Government and Politics.

See you online tomorrow, Warriors!