Substitute Work: Non-Democratic Models of Governance!

Hello, there!

We have already talked about this in class, so it should be no surprise that I’m absent today.  Just a few general reminders: you should receive your notification of which Harkness discussion you’re responsible for this unit in the next couple of days.  Also, please make sure you check the blog posting with all the due dates for this unit– I think I may have goofed on the A-B scheduling on my handout (I think I flipped them?), so there are some minor changes to when things are going to be due.

Here’s what you’re going to do today through Friday:

  1. Help the substitute to take roll.  Our rosters are obviously going to have a lot of your classmates missing due to the trip, so help the substitute figure out who is present and who isn’t for each class, and then have a volunteer take the rosters up to the office.
  1. This work is designed to be spread over the three days you have until the break, and it doesn’t particularly matter what order you do it in.  If Dr. Roach’s work is more structured, please do that first, and then move on to your Comparative work.  The thing that matters most is that you have ALL of the following work done before you come back to class on the 27th, so you will need to focus.
  2. Pick up a map of the Russian Federation, and the list of the political and physical characteristics I want you to be able to identify. You may use the green atlases in the back of the room as sources, your phones (IF YOU ARE BEING PRODUCTIVE), the map on the first page of your 3.2 reader, or the laptops to help you find all of the relevant locations.  You can choose to use color or not—I am NOT collecting this map, so it’s really up to you.  (Just remember, though—even if I’m not collecting this map, I WILL be asking questions about it on the quiz during this unit, so you’d best take this seriously.)
  1. Once you’re done with your map, get out a laptop (or use your phone). You’re going to do work on Models of Nondemocratic Regimes, and you’re going to need to download a copy of this worksheet: Models of Nondemocratic Rule.  I want you to type directly into the worksheet, as it will make the chart easier to fill out.  Follow the directions exactly—first you’ll need to read an article on Freedom House about their methodology so you understand how they come to their decisions re: Free, Partly Free, and Not Free designations, and THEN you’ll need to use your 3.1 reading packet AND Freedom House to define, describe, and identify modern examples of each model of nondemocratic regimes.  You will need to PRINT OUT this worksheet and turn it into the box up front by the 27th of November– regardless of whether or not you have my class that day.
  1. Once you’ve finished both your annotated map AND the Freedom House work, please complete your first Current Event for this unit.  You can follow this link to get to the blog entry where the Google form is located.  While I will let you use a non-Russian source for this assignment (please use ONLY the resources I’ve linked to), I do also suggest that you use a Russian source for at least ONE of your current events.  Learning to read through material and understand potential bias is critically important, and I want you to learn to identify propaganda when you see it. Remember, your first current event will be due on November 27th, no matter what class you are.
  2. It is absolutely critical that you guys make it through this work over the next few days; I’m going to be working under the assumption that when I see you again you’ll have a solid understanding of this material.  I’m relying on you to do the work I ask of you, so please don’t let me down on this.   Work hard, be good for the sub, happy Thanksgiving, and I’ll see you soon!

Thanks,

Ms. Galloway

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Current Event 1: Russian Federation!

Your first current event for Unit Three will be due on Monday, November 27th by the start of your class period. In order to do this, you will need to use one of the following publications:

BE AWARE THAT SEVERAL OF THOSE ARE RUSSIAN STATE-RUN MEDIA OUTLETS.  You can certainly use them, but you should DEFINITELY do your research and keep your eyes open for propaganda and suppression of dissent– that should be part of your analysis.

Find an article in one of those publications that is on a recent event or significant topic in the Russian Federation– preferably, one of interest to you. Read the article carefully (consider printing it out so that you can annotate it, perhaps), and the complete the form below. You will need to provide the URL to your article, so make sure you don’t lose it!

 

Hey, are you registered to vote? Are you eighteen? If you are, you can vote tomorrow! You should do that.

Have I told you guys how much I love voting? I love it a lot.  There’s a bunch about our electoral system and democracy that is imperfect, but for me, the act of voting itself– no matter its flaws– is always deeply resonant.  It’s an act that declares that the individual matters, that the public has a voice and the right and space to use it.  I find that there’s something awesome about standing in line with members of my community, lined up to do something that is both incredibly mundane and, if one considers the sprawling history of man, incredibly radical.

So! If you’re eligible to vote tomorrow, please consider doing so.  The races are almost entirely local, which means that turnout is going to be SUPER low– and if you want your vote to have a high degree of impact in an SMD system, this is the sort of election where it matters most.

Here are the sample ballots for Cobb County for tomorrow’s elections; there aren’t many races for us, and the super-local nature of them means that you’re going to need to do some heavy duty Googling of the candidates to help you understand what the stakes are.  But maybe the resources below will help:

Cobb County Sample Ballots:

To determine exactly what you will be eligible to vote for in tomorrow’s election, please go to the Georgia My Voter page and log in with your name, birthdate, and county of registration.  If you’re a registered voter, you’ll see a page that looks like this:

MVP screenshot.png

Beneath your registration information in the upper lefthand box, you’ll see a link for sample ballots.  If you click it, you should get a preview of what your ballot tomorrow will look like.  If the sample ballot doesn’t display, you can look in the lower righthand corner to see what constituencies you’re a part of, which should help you get a sense of what you’ll be voting on.  So, if you look at mine, you can see that I’m not in Georgia Senate District 06, which means I won’t be eligible to vote in that race tomorrow.  But I do live in the city of Marietta, which means that I will be eligible to vote in those municipal elections listed above.

It can get a little confusing, I’ll admit.  That’s why I like to pay attention to local media sources for information about local and municipal races– the Marietta Daily Journal has some good run-downs on the super-local races, and if you or your family have connections to Atlanta, WABE did some seriously excellent reporting on those races as well.

And if you just want to know how the whole election thing works, from A to Z, I wrote up a huge explanation last year.  It’s primarily talking about national federal elections, but the actual process and “what you should expect” stuff is still relevant.

So there you are: you have all the tools and resources I can give you to help you make an informed, thoughtful choice in your first election.  Remember that your vote is an institution, and institutions are only powerful so long as we agree they are.  Remember how rare the opportunity is to choose one’s own government, and don’t let the opportunity slide just because it’s a small election.  Sometimes those are the ones that matter most.

Go forth and democratize, y’all.  Go earn that peach sticker.

Take-Home Unit Two Written Test

Today in class, you received your Unit Two written test.  Please remember that you have the opportunity to do this as a take-home test because I am trying to be cognizant of the fact that we’ve all had a rough couple of weeks– this means that I ABSOLUTELY expect you to do your own work on this, and that any indication of plagiarism will be taken seriously.

While I’ve indicated a suggested time limit on this test, obviously I can’t enforce it.  However, I would suggest that you try completing your answers in the given time, just to practice the timed element of the writing.

You will need to CITE your answers using APA in-text citations– which means you, of course, may use outside sources to complete this assignment.  I want you to understand this material by the time you turn in your test.  Make sure the sources you use are scholarly, reputable, and accurate.

You must upload your finished test to TurnItIn.com by 11:59 PM on Sunday, November 5th.  The class ID code is 16706296, and the enrollment code (password) is “parliament.” You may reupload it and check the originality score as often as you need to up until that point.  Any submissions after 11:59 PM on November will receive an immediate 20% deduction for late work.  This means that IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM UPLOADING, YOU CANNOT WAIT UNTIL THE LAST MINUTE TO CONTACT ME ABOUT IT.

Good luck, bon chance, and buena suerte!

 

Foreign Relations in the UK: Work for Thursday!

If you missed class on Thursday, first of all– I am 100% counting your absence as excused in terms of how I handle it, so no need to worry there.

Here’s what you need to do to make up your work:

First, select ONE of the following topics to research.  Make sure to look on current news sites and find the most up-to-date information. You need to develop a solid understanding of the topic:

1.The Falklands War (1982)

2.Hong Kong Handover (1997)

3.US-UK Relations (Present)

4.“Interventionism” in Iraq and Afghanistan (ca. 2004)

5.Syrian Civil War / Refugees (Present)

6.British-Russian Relations (Present)

Once you have thoroughly researched your topic, you will create a mock front page of a newspaper dealing with one of the historical or contemporary events pertaining to international relations in Britain listed previously. Do this on a single sheet of printer paper.

Your newspaper must have:

  • A masthead (name of the paper, date, slogan)
  • A headline which informs and catches attention
  • A relevant visual with a caption (a graph, chart, mock photograph, etc.)
  • A brief summary of the relevant events or issues. Address causes, effects, and political implications.

Send me an email, guys, if you have any questions about this assignment.

Current Event 2: The United Kingdom

Depending on your class meeting schedule this week, you will be required to complete your first current event assignment by the 24th or 25th of October.  In order to do this, you will need to use one of the following British publications:

Find an article in one of those publications that is on a recent event or significant topic related to politics and government in the United Kingdom– preferably, one of interest to you.  Read the article carefully (consider printing it out so that you can annotate it, perhaps), and the complete the form below.  You will need to provide the URL to your article, so make sure you don’t lose it!  You may want to type your answers into a Word doc before copying and pasting your answers into the Google form below, just in case you have difficulties with submitting your response.

Updated Pacing Guide for UK and Quiz Correction Schedule!

Hey, guys! After the craziness of last week AND the fact that I have to be out on Wednesday of this week, I needed to sit down and re-assess how the pacing for this unit would go.  Please examine the chart below in order to see when assignments are due– there are changes to the dates for your upcoming Harkness discussions and current events, as well as an in-class writing assignment.

FIRST AND FOREMOST: YOUR TEST IS STILL GOING TO BE ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27th.  It turns out I built in JUST enough flex days to make this work without pushing the test back, so we’re going to stick to our overall pacing plan and end the unit on the 27th, regardless.

Topic

Assignments Due “A” Day

“B” Day

UK Political Parties In-class work on political parties; will be due next class meeting. Tuesday, October 17th Monday, October 16th
UK Political Parties and Society Finish work on political parties; timed in-class writing during latter half of class. Thursday, October 19th Wednesday, October 18th
UK and the European Union Third Harkness discussion over Brexit readings Monday, October 23rd Friday, October 20th
UK Political Economy / Current Debates Current event #2 due by class time. Wednesday, October 25th

Tuesday, October 24th

This modified schedule will result in me seeing “B” day classes one extra time before the test (on October 26th), which means that we can do any necessary clean-up of material we might not have got to by that point due to my absences.  Seems only fair that they get the extra day this time.

Now, on to quiz corrections!  Below you will see the two forms for quiz correction schedules.  Please choose the correction schedule for YOUR CLASS, and choose which days you would like to do your corrections.  I really need you to stick to your class period this time, guys, because you took two different versions of this quiz and I need to make sure I have the correct versions ready for you when you come for corrections.

“A” DAY CORRECTION SCHEDULE:

“B” DAY CORRECTION SCHEDULE:

Please let me know if you have any questions about the pacing or material for this unit as we get closer to the test!

 

UK Political History and Institutions: Sub Plans

Hey, guys! Sorry about the absence today.  In order to make sure we don’t fall (further) behind in terms of content, you guys will be finishing the lecture we started the last time I saw you in class.  I’ve recorded the whole lecture as a screen captured video lecture, so you need to get out your notes, and follow along with the notes as I explain everything.  You can pause the video as need  be to give you enough time to take notes.

There’s a secondary assignment following this video lecture, and you WILL need to have it completed before our next class period– however, watching the video lectures is the most important thing you need to do today.

Other points of order:

  1. We’ll address your Harkness readings during our next class meeting.
  2. You’ll get your quizzes back and your corrections schedule the next time I see you.

Work hard today, okay? We need to get back on track in terms of pacing.

Video Lecture:

UK Political Institutions:

Once you’ve finished watching the above videos, please do the following:

  1. Get out your 2.2 reading packet.  You’ll want to turn to page 258 (little numbers)– the portion of the reading on British political institutions.
  2. Get a sheet of white copy paper from the table up front. You’re going to use this to map out one of several aspects of British political institutions.
  3. Choose ONE of the following British political institutions to examine: the Constitution (yes, I know I said there’s not a written Constitution; that doesn’t mean there isn’t a body of law that functions as such), the Crown, the Prime Minister, the Cabinet, the Legislature, and the Judiciary.  Each of these subjects has a heading in your reading on political institutions in the UK.  It would be best if you would try to divide up the areas of study evenly through the class (that is, not everyone should focus on the Crown), but I’ll leave that up to you.
  4. Read your section of the text carefully, and then use the information in the reading to create the following map of information on your chosen political institution:

united-kingdom_political-history

This organizer will be due at the start of your next Comparative class meeting.

(And if you need help, or are confused by what to do, send me a notification via Remind.)

UK Current Event 1

Depending on your class meeting schedule this week, you will be required to complete your first current event assignment by the 2nd or 3rd of October.  In order to do this, you will need to use one of the following British publications:

Find an article in one of those publications that is on a recent event or significant topic related to politics and government in the United Kingdom– preferably, one of interest to you.  Read the article carefully (consider printing it out so that you can annotate it, perhaps), and the complete the form below.  You will need to provide the URL to your article, so make sure you don’t lose it!  You may want to type your answers into a Word doc before copying and pasting your answers into the Google form below, just in case you have difficulties with submitting your response.

Have a good rest of your break, guys!

Study Game! (And Case Study Zero Summaries.)

In case you’re looking for more ways to review for your test tomorrow, you might try playing the game linked below:

Unit One Test Review: Introduction to Comparative Politics and US Government

Additionally, here are the one-page summaries I received digitally for each of the subject areas on your Case Study Zero projects. Remember, third period classes had fewer groups as a result of their class sizes, and I received some of the summaries in hard-copy rather than in a digital format.  Thus, the links below represent only a part of the one-page summaries received.

Government Structure:

Bureaucracy and the Judiciary:

Social Cleavages and Social Movements:

Elections and Political Parties:

Media, Politics, and Participation:

Economics and Populations:

Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, and Freedoms:

Citizenship, Representation, and Civil Society:

Social Welfare and the Environment: